Aug 06

Fraudulent Olympic Tickets to Beijing

One of the sad stories that will come out of the China Olympics is the scam made by BeijingTicketing.com to so many Olympics enthusiast and families of athletes. When something like this happens, the uninvolved usually just shrug their shoulders and wonder why the victims were unaware of the risks or we would just feel sorry for them.

However, when you hear about individual stories, everything starts to have a face and a circumstance. You feel outrage and wonder how a human being can deface the one event that brings the world together to celebrate the human beings’ continuous pursuit of excellence. The Olympics is the very symbol of global unity and cooperation. Yet, someone out there has taken advantage of this unifying event to steal from other people.

I find the stories of athletes’ families whose enthusiasm and excitement were trampled by this scam when they chose to purchase their tickets for the site. Tickets are not cheap and imagine how long a father saved up enough for the tickets just so he can cheer his daughter during the swimming competition. There was also an entire family who was victimized and lost thousands of dollars after buying 3 tickets for himself, his wife, and their other daughter. Now, they will have to watch and cheer from their own home.

Jim Moriarty, a Houston-based lawyer, lost $12,000 on tickets and will miss out on opening and closing cermonies. He set up a web site, BeijingTicketScam.com, to help ticket scam victims and went live Saturday. He is also asking for assistance from the International Olympic Committee and the US Olympic Committee to get victims tickets once they arrive in China. Moriarty claims that the IOC knew about the site in March but failed to act on it which eventually led to so many victims of the scam. It was already too late when the IOC and the USOC filed lawsuits in Arizona and California. Nevertheless, Moriarty believes there is very little that the legal system can do since the US addresses that the site used were fake.

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